We All Are Orphans

My Life

Lemony Snicket delivered the prime example of what critic Lenika Cruz called “postmodern literature for children” (Atlantic, October, 2014). The Baudelaire siblings, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny (a snappish baby with sharp teeth), endured thirteen volumes of misery in “A Series of Unfortunate Events” starting with a house fire that killed their parents.

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My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

The Glorious English Countryside in 2014

Louisa Young, London journalist and novelist, and wife of a composer, grew up in the house where the story Peter Pan was written by Sir J. M. Barrie. Some older readers will remember the boy who does not want to grow up and lives with other Lost Boys (who fell out of their baby prams)

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London Journal: Xenophobia Cramps London Style

There is a xenophobia here that I have previously experienced only in outdated novels.

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What You Read is Who You Are

At the end of a four-day weekend, my granddaughter was bored. Dad still had work to do at his desk, but the generally cooperative child who can easily entertain herself was tired of writing and even tired of Legos. Luckily, I called as pre-arranged to read with her over the phone. We had started

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Quill Hedgehog On His Way

MOXIE WONDERS… Why don’t we have hedgehogs in the United States?

According to the online National Geographic animal encyclopedia (animals.nationalgeographic.com), hedgehogs are about the size of three teacups. That is a perfect comparison, as hedgehogs are famously English. Some people there have them as sort-of pets. That’s because they eat garden pests.

We do not

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